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Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby tomvet » 04 Feb 2014 20:32

Is there a difference!
In fact you can add another - In Northern Ireland its called the Ulster fry!

So who is the entrepreneur and who are the copy cats?
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Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby Skier Pete » 04 Feb 2014 22:23

tomvet wrote:Is there a difference!
In fact you can add another - In Northern Ireland its called the Ulster fry!

So who is the entrepreneur and who are the copy cats?

There certainly is:- where else but in Wales would you get lava bread cooked in bacon fat as a major constituent of a full breakfast.
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Postby Barry » 04 Feb 2014 22:29

I love a full breakfast when on holiday in the UK

Three weeks starting on Skye out to Harris, back to Badcall Bay, then North up towards Tongue then South via kingussie, I had to give the last morning full Monty a miss, chickened out on the last morning, didn't fancy the drive home on a full stomach :roll: wimp or what. :oops:
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Postby CGBOWLER » 04 Feb 2014 22:30

What about the full American then Tom?
At the Travelodge hotel at JFK we saw a pilot help himself to bacon, eggs, sausages, hashbrowns, mushrooms, baked beans and tomatoes.
Then he poured maple syrup over the whole lot. :o
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Re: Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby tomvet » 04 Feb 2014 22:45

From Wikipedia

English breakfast

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A traditional full English breakfast includes bacon (traditionally back bacon[5]), poached or fried eggs, fried or grilled tomatoes, fried mushrooms, fried bread or toast with butter, sausages and baked beans, usually served with a mug of tea. As nearly everything is fried in this meal, it is commonly called a "fry-up".

Black pudding is often added, as are fried leftover mashed potatoes (called potato cakes) or hash browns (borrowed from the cuisine of the United States). Originally a way to use up leftover vegetables from the main meal of the day before, bubble and squeak, shallow-fried left-over vegetables with potato, has become a breakfast feature in its own right. Onions, either fried or in rings, occasionally appear.[citation needed] In the North Midlands, fried or grilled oatcakes sometimes replace fried bread. When an English breakfast is ordered with everything available it is often referred to as a Full English, or a Full Monty.


Irish breakfast

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In Ireland, as elsewhere, the exact constituents of a full breakfast vary, depending on geographical area, personal taste and cultural affiliation. Traditionally, the most common ingredients are bacon rashers, sausages, fried eggs, white pudding, black pudding, toast and fried tomato.[6] Sauteed mushrooms are also sometimes included,[7] as well as baked beans, liver (although popularity has declined), and brown soda bread.[8] A full Irish breakfast may be accompanied by a strong Irish breakfast tea (such as Barry's Tea, Lyons Tea or Bewley's breakfast blend) often served with milk. Fried potato farl, boxty or toast is often served as an alternative to brown soda bread.

The "breakfast roll",[9] consisting of elements of the full breakfast served in a French roll, has become popular due to the fact it can be easily eaten on the way to school or work, similar to the breakfast burrito in the United States.[9] The breakfast roll is available from many petrol stations and convenience stores throughout Ireland.[9]


Ulster Fry


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An Ulster fry is a dish similar to the Irish breakfast and is popular throughout Ulster, where it is eaten not only at breakfast time but throughout the day.

Between 2001 and 2007, the television channel BBC Two Northern Ireland used a station ID during local opt-outs from national UK programming which featured the BBC Two logo eating an Ulster fry.[10]

Scotland

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In Scotland, the full breakfast, as with others, contains eggs, back bacon, link sausage, buttered toast, baked beans, and tea or coffee. Distinctively Scottish elements include Scottish style black pudding, sliced sausage, and tattie scones. It commonly also includes fried or grilled tomato and/or mushrooms and occasionally haggis, white pudding, fruit pudding[11] or oatcakes.[12][13] As with other breakfasts it has become more common, especially within the home, to grill the meats, puddings and tomatoes and to only fry the eggs and tattie scones. Another more historical Scottish breakfast is porridge and may occasionally be served as a starter.

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable refers to a Scotch breakfast as "a substantial breakfast of sundry sorts of good things to eat and drink".[14]

American

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The style of breakfast has carried over to the US and Canada, though continental breakfast foods are also popular. A full breakfast in these countries often consists of eggs, meat such as bacon, ham, sausage, scrapple (US only), pork roll (US only), Spam, steak or country fried steak (US only), and grits (US only) or fried potatoes such as hash browns or home fries. Accompanying the meal might be toasted white, wheat or rye bread, English muffins, bagels, waffles, pancakes, oatmeal, cinnamon rolls, biscuits, fruit or fruit juice and beverages such as coffee or tea.

It is often referred to as a "country breakfast", "Sunday breakfast", or a "big breakfast" in many areas of the Midwestern or Southern United States.

In Canada, the meal may be known as a lumberjack breakfast. In Quebec, the meal may include regional variants like crêpes, buckwheat galettes, boudin, baked beans and cretons.


Wales


The traditional Welsh breakfast includes laverbread, a seaweed purée which is mixed with eggs, bacon, and cockles and fried into crisp patties.[15]
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Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby tomvet » 04 Feb 2014 22:46

CGBOWLER wrote:What about the full American then Tom?
At the Travelodge hotel at JFK we saw a pilot help himself to bacon, eggs, sausages, hashbrowns, mushrooms, baked beans and tomatoes.
Then he poured maple syrup over the whole lot. :o


Crikey Irene! That is not breakfast, that is Swill! :shock: :shock:
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Re: Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby JollyJill » 04 Feb 2014 23:34

I remember being in a B & B in Torquay some years ago with Plunky. There was a young Japanese guy staying there and ordered a ull English breakfast.
When it was put in front of him, you could tell that he wasn't sure how to tackle it.
He sat and thought for a while and in true Japanese style, gort out his camera and took a photo of it. :lol:
I don't think he actually ate much of it but it was amusing to watch his reaction to it. :lol:
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Re: Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby tomvet » 05 Feb 2014 00:35

JollyJill wrote:I remember being in a B & B in Torquay some years ago with Plunky. There was a young Japanese guy staying there and ordered a ull English breakfast.
When it was put in front of him, you could tell that he wasn't sure how to tackle it.
He sat and thought for a while and in true Japanese style, gort out his camera and took a photo of it. :lol:
I don't think he actually ate much of it but it was amusing to watch his reaction to it. :lol:


Photographing food eh! Had he vaguely familiar face Jill?
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Re: Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby tomvet » 05 Feb 2014 00:49

Apparently there is such a thing as a Cornish breakfast also!

From Wilipedia!

Cornwall[edit]

The traditional Cornish breakfast includes hog's pudding and Cornish potato cakes (made with mashed potatoes mixed with flour and butter and then fried),[1][2] or fried potatoes alongside the usual bacon, sausage, tomato, mushrooms, egg and toast.[2] In the past traditional Cornish breakfasts have included pilchards and herring,[3] or gurty pudding, a Cornish dish similar to haggis, not to be confused with gurty milk, another Cornish breakfast dish made with bread and milk.[4]

I wonder if there is a Manx breakfast?
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Re: Full Irish, English, Welsh, Scottish Breakfast!

Postby CGBOWLER » 05 Feb 2014 01:48

tomvet wrote:
I wonder if there is a Manx breakfast?


Kippers Tom. ;)
We often have a shelf full of Manx kippers in the freezer brought back by OH when he marshalled bike races there, nowadays by a friend.

We had an Irish bar steward at the bowling club and when he visited his family, who lived near Dublin, he always brought OH some white pudding back and it was very good.
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