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MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby Gillzajoker » 19 Nov 2020 10:22

I haven't been to Lisbon, Geoff, so loved all those great photos showcasing the highlights. Apart from
the selfish couple, great that you chose well in taking the minibus tour instead of the HOHO, and again
dropped lucky with your choice of restaurant. And your evening meal and entertainment rounded off
a most enjoyable day. :D
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MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby judgegeoff » 20 Nov 2020 06:56

Day 5 – Friday 12th October 2007 - Gibraltar


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Gibraltar.

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Gibraltar is a British Overseas Territory and headland, on Spain's south coast. It’s dominated by the Rock of Gibraltar, a 426m-high limestone ridge. First settled by the Moors in the Middle Ages it was later ruled by Spain. In 1704, Anglo-Dutch forces captured Gibraltar from Spain during the War of the Spanish Succession on behalf of the Habsburg claim to the Spanish throne. In 1713 it was ceded to Great Britain as part of the Treaty of Utrecht. During the Napoleonic Wars and World War 2 it was an important base for the Royal Navy as it controlled the entrance and exit to the Mediterranean Sea, the Strait of Gibraltar, which is only 14.3km (8.9mi) wide at this naval choke point. It remains strategically important, with half the world's seaborne trade passing through the strait. Today Gibraltar's economy is based largely on tourism, online gambling, financial services and bunkering.

Chris and I had been to Gibraltar many times as Chris’ parents had a holiday home in Calahonda, near Marbella, and we used to go shopping in Gibraltar when staying there (M&S underwear and English style bacon especially!).


=====================================

As the “Norwegian Gem” was not due into Gibraltar until 11:00 am, we had a very leisurely breakfast and then watched her approach ‘The Rock’. We docked, as usual, right on schedule and met Arne and Sue on the quayside and made our way into town on foot.

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The “Norwegian Gem” berthed in Gibraltar.

There were two other ships in Gibraltar that day, the “Arcadia” and the “Ocean Majesty” – so potentially 5,400 visitors (excluding crews) and the town was very, very crowded. It was very difficult to make our way up the High Street and we soon gave up any ideas of doing anything ‘touristy’. We stopped for coffees in a little cafe and I purchased a small digital camera, a Panasonic Lumix, similar to Chris’ camera. We then walked back to the Ship as this was only a short visit – our ship was due to depart at 3:30 pm.

As usual, the ship left on time and we went up on deck to watch her leave. “Arcadia” and “Ocean Majesty” were also leaving at about the same time and, once clear of the port, the three ships seemed to be racing each other. Sue and Chris left us to start getting ready for dinner but Arne and I stayed on deck. Soon after the girls had left us, we saw a large pod of dolphins playing in the ship’s wake. It was a real shame that Sue and Chris missed seeing them, they love dolphins.

We decided to eat in the ‘Grand Pacific’ dining room this evening and afterwards went for ‘Painkiller’ cocktails in the ‘Star Bar’ which had background Frank Sinatra style music. We then made our way to the ‘Stardust Theatre’ for the evening show which starred American comedian David Naster. Although he was generally very good, there were times when the difference between British and American humour surfaced and we didn’t always find his jokes very funny.

After the show, we had a quick look at the shops and then took a turn around the decks before retiring to our cabins for the night.


================================================


Day 6 – Saturday 13th October 2007 - Day at sea


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A day at sea.

As we were had a sea day today, we decided to have a bit of a lie-in and then have breakfast in the ‘Blue Lagoon’, the ship’s 24-hour restaurant. This restaurant had good ambience and service, but the choice of breakfast items was more limited than in the main restaurants and the buffet, although I personally preferred it for breakfast.

After a good breakfast we headed for the ‘Stardust Theatre’ where one of the crew was giving a talk about our next ports of call – Naples/Pompeii, Civitavecchia (for Rome), Livorno (for Pisa and Florence), Nice and Barcelona. Quite a whistle-stop tour! However, it was quite an informative talk and we looked forward to visiting these ports.

After the talk we went up to deck 12 for coffee in the ‘Garden Cafe’, but found that a German ‘Oompha’ band was playing in the ‘Great Outdoors’ (the open-air portion of the cafe). Luckily we were able to find a table for four persons, so listened to the band whilst supping our coffees.

Afterwards, we went for a bracing walk around the upper decks, hoping to spot some dolphins or even a whale, but were unlucky this time and only saw a lot of water. We visited the golf putting area, the combined tennis/basketball/football court and the rock climbing wall.

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The sports court.

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The ship’s rock climbing wall.

We had lunch by the ‘Tahitian’ swimming pool (I had a really tasty beef cheeseburger and chips) and stayed there for a while and enjoyed some cool drinks.

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The ship’s ‘Tahitian’ swimming pool.

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“Cheers”!

I then went to the ship’s library to borrow a book whilst Chris had a swim in the pool. As it was a brand new ship, even the books were all brand new – no dog eared pages or dubious stains.

As dinner was formal dress code this evening, we got dressed up in our finery this evening and headed for ‘Casey’s Steakhouse’ where we had made reservations for 6:00 pm. The food here was absolutely stunning – I started with crab cakes, then a lobster bisque, then a fillet mignon for the main course and ended with delicious banana flambe dessert. The service was impeccable and the portions generous – all in all a very fine meal.

Dinner was followed by our usual cocktails and then Sue, Chris and myself made our way to the ‘Stardust Theatre’ where the Norwegian Gem orchestra, singers and dancers were staging a show ‘Get Down Tonight’ featuring music from the 1970s. Again, the standard of entertainment was very good and the costumes and lighting made it very colourful. Arne had stayed behind in the ‘Java Cafe’ as the England versus France Rugby World Cup match was being shown on a 20-foot screen behind the bar.

After the show, we joined Arne to watch the final few minutes of a historic English victory. I think almost every Englishman on the ship were squeezed into the ‘Java Cafe’ to watch the match and the shouts that erupted when the final whistle was blown must have been heard in Gibraltar and possibly Naples!

That evening the ship’s chef’s produced a display of the chocolatier’s art for us to enjoy and here are some of Chris’ photos of it:-

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A white chocolate castle …..

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….. and a dark chocolate one.

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If you see a queue at a chocolate buffet – join it!…..

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….. chocolate dipped strawberries? Yes please, Mmmmm!

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A chocolate Pharoah.

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Chocolate on the beach.

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Liberace would have enjoyed this.

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Another chocolate piano.

After this feast for the eyes (and the tummy), we retired to our cabin for the night. Tomorrow would be another day at sea.


=========================================


Continued tomorrow ……………..
Geoff

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MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby Gillzajoker » 20 Nov 2020 14:23

Shame your visit to Gib. was so short and overcrowded, Geoff, but as you had visited many times before,
not too much of a disappointment. On a previous visit I was lucky in that I had friends who lived there,
whom I had met on a previous cruise,so they picked me on at the dock and took me round all the most
interesting places. Your evening meal sounds fabulous - I'm sure I would have chosen the same, and the
photos of the fantastic chocolate creations are a wonder to behold :D
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MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby judgegeoff » 21 Nov 2020 07:33

Day 7 – Sunday 14th October 2007 - Day at sea

This was another day at sea and was spent generally much the same as the previous day. Chris went swimming and we played shuffleboard on deck 7 promenade with Arne and Sue. We also made a few purchases in the ship’s shops.

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Shuffleboarding with Arne and Sue.

We got dressed up in our finery again this evening and went to the ‘Grand pacific’ main dining room where I had to make a very hard choice – ‘Lobster, prawn, scallop and seafood extravaganza’ or ‘Beef Wellington’ – and chose the latter which was very nice.

After dinner, we had drinks in the ‘Java Cafe’, mainly for Arne to reserve his seat for another of the Rugby World Cup semi-finals, between South Africa and Argentina. Leaving Arnie, Sue, Chris and I made our way to the ‘Stardust Theatre’ where tonight’s entertainment was ‘Second City’, the Chicago based improvisation comedy troupe that launched the careers of many American comedians including Bill Murray, Martin Short, John and Jim Belushi, Chevy Chase and Joan Rivers. Sadly, the group that were performing on our ship were not in the same class as the aforementioned stars and their performance was really dire. After a few minutes of starting their performance people started to leave the theatre and this developed into an exodus. We stayed for a while but eventually could stand no more and so joined the stream leaving. It was the only bad show we saw on the ship and we were confident that this particular act would not be invited to return. Truly, it was embarrassingly bad! So we left the theatre and joined Arne in the ‘Java Cafe’ and watched the rest of the rugby game which, to our delight, was won by South Africa.

We had a walk around the decks before retiring to our cabin for the night. In the morning we would be visiting Naples in Italy.


=========================================


Day 8 – Monday 15th October 2007 - Naples, Italy


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Naples, Italy.

Naples, a city in southern Italy, sits on the Bay of Naples. Nearby is Mount Vesuvius, the still-active volcano that destroyed nearby Roman town Pompeii. Dating to the 2nd millennium B.C., Naples has centuries of important art and architecture.

Our ship, as usual, arrived at our next port, Naples, on time and was soon berthed. We had breakfast in the ‘Garden cafe’ and then left the ship with Arne and Sue and, as we exited the port, were offered various trips by the local taxi drivers. We decided to hire a taxi driver named Chiro to drive us to Sorrento in his Seat car as we wanted to see the coastal road that we had seen on so many films. En route, we stopped off at a small factory making cameo brooches and rings etc. The carver was a 76-year-old man whose hands were terribly calloused and gnarled by the work that he carried out over the decades. Chris purchased a dual cameo brooch/necklace to complement the cameo ring that she has had for many years.

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Our ship berthed in Naples.

On the lovely coast road to Sorrento we passed Mount Vesuvius to our left and also many olive trees with nets hung underneath them to catch the olives as they fell off the trees. Just before we entered the town of Sorrento we called at another small factory that made veneered furniture and other wooden objects, using very fine parquetry techniques. Sue bought a nice music box as a souvenir*.

* When I was a young lad my hero was my Uncle Jack who was a Chief Petty Officer in the Royal Navy, serving on the aircraft carrier “HMS Ark Royal”. On one of his leaves he brought us a veneered music box that played “Take me back to Sorrento”.

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The Amalfi coast road with steep drops (and crazy drivers!).

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The Bay of Naples as seen from the road.

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Lovely sea views.

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Looking down into Sorrento from the wooden goods factory.

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A small cruise ship tendering at Sorrento.

We parked in an underground car park and Chiro told us that he had once driven the King of Greece in his taxi and showed us a letter from the King, thanking him for the ride and inviting him to look him up if visiting Greece – yeah, right, that made us smile! We went into the town of Sorrento and found it to be a lovely place, albeit it was rather touristy.

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Chiro’s taxi (always take a photo of a taxi you use and then, if there is a problem or you leave something behind etc., at least you will be able to trace the taxi).

After walking around Sorrento and stopping for coffees in a nice coffee, we returned to the car park where Chiro was waiting for us. It was a very wild ride back with Chiro overtaking where he shouldn’t and abusing a lot of other road users (and pedestrians), both verbally and with his horn. The drivers in Naples are terrible, worse than Rome and possibly the worst in Europe. Chiro dropped us in the centre of Naples and we were glad to arrive there in one piece!

We then went to look at the Castel Nuovo which dates back to 1279 AD and is still in very good condition, due to the mild Mediterranean climate. It seemed to be a popular wedding venue as there were a couple of wedding parties having photographs taken in the castle grounds. (Little did I know that 10 years later I would be walking my youngest down the aisle at Colchester castle). There were a lot of African traders selling ‘genuine’ Rolex watches and ‘Prada’ and ‘Gucci’ handbags for just a few Euros around the castle area.

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The impressive Castel Nuovo in Naples.

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A strong fortress.

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The castle’s main entrance, across a bridge.

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A rather damaged door.

After viewing the castle we felt in need of refreshment, so headed back into the town. We found an enclosed shopping area, Galleria Umberto, where the separate buildings had been covered with an amazingly beautiful glass roof. The flooring was all clad in marble, set into geometric patterns. There were only a few restaurants and bars open, as there was much construction work being carried out, but we did find an ice cream shop that sold the most fantastic ice cream cornets and we enjoyed them whilst sitting at a table and chairs outside the shop. On subsequent visits to Naples we have revisited the shop and have always enjoyed their cornets. Highly recommended!

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The classical entrance to Galleria Umberto.

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Galleria Umberto

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The glass roof.

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Work to the Galleria was still ongoing on this visit.

We did a little more sightseeing and window shopping and then headed back to the ship. After freshening up we headed for the ‘Garden Cafe’ for a drink and a snack. That evening we ate in the ‘Blue Lagoon’ restaurant and had another good meal.

The show in the ‘Stardust Theatre’ featured Donny Ray Evins who was a Nat King Cole lookalike and singer. He was very, very good and we really enjoyed his show. Afterwards, we went to the ‘Maltings Beer and Whisky Bar’ to have a cocktail and listen to a guitarist/singer named Kim Doolittle who was also very good and easy to listen to.

We then retired to our cabin for an early night as we had to assemble in the theatre, fed and watered, by 8:30 am, ready for our day trip to Rome.


======================================

Continued tomorrow ……...
Geoff

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Postby Gillzajoker » 21 Nov 2020 12:14

Some really wonderful photos there, Geoff, and some interesting snippets as well. Not often you
get a show that is utterly deplorable, so glad the next night made up for it. And a good tip about
taking a photo of your taxi! :D
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Postby judgegeoff » 22 Nov 2020 07:08

Day 9 – Tuesday 16th October 2007 - Civitavecchia (for Rome)


After an early breakfast in the ‘Garden Cafe,’ we assembled in the theatre for our excursion to Rome. Often we do our own thing on shore and arrange our own trips, but we knew that Rome was about a 90-minute ride from Civitavecchia and, not knowing what time Rome’s rush hour started and how long it would take to get back to the port, we decided to go on one of the ship’s excursions. Additionally, in a busy place like Rome, you will see a lot more of the sights than you would see on an independent visit. If you are on a ship’s excursion and return to the ship is delayed, the ship will wait until you return. However, if you are not on a ship’s excursion, the ship will NOT normally wait for you and will leave without you (we have seen this).

After a short wait in the theatre, we were escorted down to the quay and boarded our coach, No. 21, for the drive to Rome. We left Civitavecchia with a guide pointing out places of interest on the way. We stopped for a comfort break at a motorway service area, but there were very few toilets, so our 15 minute stop extended to 30 minutes. We then got involved in horrendous queueing due to an accident which delayed us even longer.

Then, just as we were approaching Rome city centre we were stopped by the police who had closed all the roads. Our guide, a young lady named Sabine, made enquiries and eventually found that the traffic had been stopped because the Italian Prime Minister, Silvio Berlusconi, was due to pass through. Sure enough, after a longish wait, we saw his cavalcade pass then, after another wait, we were finally allowed to proceed. We finally arrived in the centre of Rome, after passing the Colosseum and other ancient ruins. We were met by a local guide, Antonella, who spoke very good English and who would be showing us the sights of Rome.

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Passing the Colosseum on the coach.

Antonella walked us a short distance until we reached the famous Trevi Fountain, one of Rome’s most beautiful fountains. Completed in 1762, it was the terminal of the Aqua Virgo aqueduct, built in 19 BC by Marcus Agrippa, which transported water about 20km into Rome. It was extremely busy at the fountain and some local men, dressed as Roman soldiers, were posing for photographs (at a price). One, sadly, was using his mobile phone most of the time – which rather spoilt the image!

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It was very crowded at the Trevi Fountain.

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Exquisite workmanship.

From the Trevi Fountain, we walked the short distance to the Pantheon, currently a Catholic church, which has a facade resembling a Roman temple whilst the building behind the facade is round with a domed roof. It was built by Agrippa, was badly damaged in a fire, and was rebuilt by Hadrian (of the Wall fame) in 118AD. The domed roof has a large circular hole in the top of it, making the interior partly open to the elements. In the middle of the marble floor there are four small holes to drain away any water that might enter via the hole in the dome. The Pantheon hosts several funereal monuments, including that of Raphael, as well as having several tombs of the Royal family. The building has survived in such good condition because it was converted to a church and so was properly maintained.

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The Parthenon, showing the temple-like exterior, fronting a circular building.

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The Latin inscription translates to “M. Agrippa, son of Lucius. Made this (building)”.

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The large columns of the facade.

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The interior, showing the hole in the dome.

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A square opposite the Pantheon …….

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…..with this obelisk style fountain.

From the Pantheon, we followed Antonella (as best we could – Rome was very overcrowded) until we reached the Piazza Navona, a rectangular square surrounded by old houses. The area was used as a stadium for games and horse and chariot racing in ancient times and the layout of the track was still visible. There was a very famous fountain in the middle of the square but, unfortunately, it was undergoing restoration was surrounded by scaffolding.

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One of the old houses.

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Piazza Navona.

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One of the smaller fountains in the Piazza.

After a further short walk, we were met by our coach and, after a successful headcount, we drove for about 20 minutes to a suburban restaurant where lunch had been prepared for us. Inside the restaurant, there were several other coach parties eating, but we were directed to som tables reserved for coach No. 21. The meal consisted of lasagne, followed by veal and zucchini and finishing with a sort of tiramisu. There was bread on the tables and bottles of red and white wines. An American lady on our table remarked at how surprised she was that so many Europeans were left-handed. At first we didn’t understand what she meant, but then realised that most of us had our forks in our left hands, whilst it seems most Americans use their forks in their right hands! Unfortunately, the restaurant’s toilets were rather inadequate for the number of people there, so long queues soon developed.

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The crowded restaurant (sorry about the poor photo).

After lunch, we all got back on our coach which took us back into Rome and parked in an underground coach park that was fairly close to Piazza S. Pietro (St. Peter’s Square). This part of the tour was not guided and so we made our own way to the Vatican area and entered St. Peter’s Square. We saw the balcony where the Pope blesses the people assembled in the huge square below. We also saw the Swiss Guards who guard the Vatican – all dressed in very colourful medieval-style uniforms.

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St. Peter’s Square is huge.

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There were a lot of people there.

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Huge columns surround the square.

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We could see the balcony that the Pope used to address and bless the crowd.

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Swiss Guards.

Unfortunately, we did not have enough time to visit the Vatican interior during this visit (but we did on a subsequent visit). By this time we were very hot and a little footsore, so we headed for a cafe that was near the square (and was also our assembly point) and sat at a table enjoying cold drinks. Whilst Rome suffers greatly from graffiti artists, it was noticeable that there was absolutely no graffiti anywhere near the Vatican area.

Our party slowly assembled and, after another successful headcount, we made our way to the nearby underground coach park to board our coach for the journey back to our ship.

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Driving over one of the River Tiber’s bridges we passed Castel Sant’Angelo (St. Michael’s Castle) which featured in the ‘Da Vinci Code’ movie.

Our journey back was much quicker than our journey in, many people slept, and our coach deposited us on the quayside, right next to the gangway. It had been a generally very enjoyable excursion and I am sure that we had seen more of Rome than if we had made an independent journey, despite the travelling out and back in of the city for lunch.

Once aboard we quickly showered and changed and then went down for dinner. The show in the theatre that evening was ‘The Magic of Duck Cameron’ – the same magician that we had seen on our first night aboard. He was quite good, but not stunning, although he did one trick involving cutting and restoring a passenger’s tie, that none of us could work out how it was done.

After the show we had a quick drink and then had another early night as we had another early start in the morning – we were visiting Livorno for Pisa and Florence.


=====================================


Continued tomorrow ……………...
Geoff

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Re: MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby rdw123 » 22 Nov 2020 10:09

Enjoying my trip around the Mediterranean with you Geoff. Picked up some useful tips along the way as well. Glad you enjoyed Rome, I wouldn’t have liked the crowds either. Happy sailing (sometime).
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MEMORIES (No. 11) - NCL MEDITERRANEAN CRUISE - 2007

Postby Gillzajoker » 22 Nov 2020 10:47

It's nearly 50 years since I was in Rome, Geoff, so it was lovely to see all your great photos whlich brought
back happy memories. I didn't recognise the uniform of the Swiss Guards - I've only seen them in short
white frilly skirts and shoes with pompoms on them! :D
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Postby judgegeoff » 23 Nov 2020 08:36

Day 10 - Wednesday 17th October 2007 - Livorno, for Florence and Pisa


Part 1 – FLORENCE


Our alarm woke us at 5:45 am and we showered and dressed and then made our way to the ‘Garden Cafe’ for an early buffet breakfast. Whilst eating we watched the ship arrive at the port of Livorno (although it was still dark). At 7:30 am we assembled in the theatre for our ships excursion to Florence and Pisa and, after a short wait, were soon down on the quay and getting aboard coach No. 3.

Our guide was named Samuele (Sam) and was really entertaining with a good sense of humour. On the way to Florence he handed everybody a radio unit with earphones so that local city guide (who we would pick up in Florence) would be able to communicate with us all easily. Unfortunately the reception of the units was very poor – the guide’s speech was distorted and it was difficult for us to understand him. We stopped en route for a comfort break and then soon reached Florence and picked up the local city guide, a young lady named Tatiana.

The coach dropped us in the centre of Florence and we headed straight for the Cathedral which was a magnificent building clad in white and coloured marble. The building of the Cathedral commenced in 1296 but was not finally completed until 1436. The facade was demolished in 1585 (nobody seems to know why) and it was rebuilt to its present form in 1887. Alongside the Cathedral is an octagonal Baptistery with a low spired roof, also clad in marble. The Baptistery has three magnificent doors, the most famous being the east door which is clad with gilded bronze panels depicting biblical scenes. It was created by Lorenzo Ghiberti between 1425 and 1452 and was called ‘Porta del Paradiso (‘Heaven’s Door’) by Michelangelo.

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The amazing Cathedral, clad in marble.

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Stunning workmanship!

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A beautiful entrance ……

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…. and another.

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Amazing architecture.

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An old building opposite the Cathedral.

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The octagonal Baptistery.

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The Baptistery’s beautiful east door…..

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….with is gilded biblical scene panels…..

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…..executed by a master craftsman.

After viewing the Cathedral and Baptistery we headed off, following our guide as best we could, until we reached the ‘Piazza della Signoria’ which was a square created between the 13th and 14th centuries and dominated by the imposing ‘Palazzo Vecchio’ (‘Vecchio Palace’) as well as several other palaces. Within the square were several old statues, including those of Cosmo d’Medici 1st sat on his horse and also one of the God of the Seas, Neptune – both oddly with the same face. Apparently, Cosmo was rather a megalomaniac and commissioned the statue of Neptune to be sculptured with his own face!. There was also a full-sized replica of Michelangelo’s ‘David’ in the square (the original is now in the Accademia Gallery), as well as several other statues.

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The Piazza della Signoria

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The statue of Cosmo 1st …..

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…..with the same face as Neptune!

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Statues od ‘David’ (left) and ‘Hercules and Cacus’ (right).

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There were statues wherever we looked!

We then walked to an area where we had a very good view of the ‘Ponte Vecchio’ (the ‘Old Bridge’), the oldest bridge in Florence. It was originally built of wood but was rebuilt in stone in the 12th century. During the terrible floods of 1333, it was demolished and was finally rebuilt, in its present form (including the shops on it) in 1345. Originally the shops sold food but, in the 16th century, they were changed to laboratories and shops for goldsmiths and silversmiths.

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The famous ‘Ponte Vecchio’ bridge.

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An amazing bridge …..

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…...with shops built on it.

From the old bridge viewpoint we continued on foot to the ‘Basilica di Santa Croce’, yet another neo-gothic faceted building clad in coloured marble. It was built during the 13th century and houses the tombs of many famous Florentines. We went into the Basilica and saw the funereal monuments of Michelangelo, Buonarroti, Niccolo Macchiavelli, Galileo, Galilet, Vittorio Alfieri , Gioacchino Rossini and Ugo Foscolo.

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The beautiful Basilica di Santa Croce.

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The tomb of Niccolo Macchiavelli.

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The tomb of Gioacchino Rossini.

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The tomb of Galileo.

Walking around Florence we were surprised how cold it was, despite it being a warm day. The buildings are very tall but the roads are very narrow, so we were in the shade nearly all the time. After visiting the Basilica we left our local guide Tatiana and rejoined our coach which took us to the ‘Anglo-American Hotel’ where we were to have a late lunch. The meal was almost identical to the one we had in Rome the previous day – lasagne, veal and chocolate gateaux. We had water, wine and rolls with the meal and coffees were served afterwards.

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We were nearly always in the shade, so it was quite cold.

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This overhead walkway reminded us of the ones in Venice and Oxford.


=============================================


Part 2 will be continued tomorrow ……………..
Geoff

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"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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Postby Gillzajoker » 23 Nov 2020 10:54

Absolutely loved today's offering, Geoff, wonderful photos and potted history. Again, it is almost 50 years
since I was in Florence but I remember being absolutely blown away by Michaelangelo's 'David' (could get
right up close to it then). Mind you, you said it was a very cold day, and I think David thought the same! ;) ;) :lol:
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