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"QUANTUM OF THE SEAS" CRUISE REVIEW

"QUANTUM OF THE SEAS" CRUISE REVIEW

Postby judgegeoff » 05 Oct 2018 13:44

“QUANTUM OF THE SEAS” CRUISE

15/09/2018 – SHANGHAI – OSAKA – KOBE – YOKOHAMA – TOKYO – SHANGHAI

ITINERARY


15/9/2018 – Embarked in Shanghai at 12:50pm, ship sailed at 4:30pm
16/9/2018 – Day at sea
17/9/2018 – Arrive in Osaka, Japan, at 2:00pm.
18/9/2018 – Depart Osaka at 4:00 am, arrive in Kobe at 7:00am, depart at 4:30pm
19/9/2018 – Arrive in Yokohama at 1:00pm, overnight in harbour.
20/9/2018 – Depart Yokohama at 7:30pm
21/9/2018 – Day at sea
22/9/2018 – Day at sea
23/9/2018 – Arrive Shanghai at 7:00am, disembark ship at 8:30am

THE SHIP

First of the Quantum class ships of Royal Caribbean International
Completed October 2014
Cost – US$935 million
Tonnage – 168,666 GT
Length – 348m (1,142 ft)
Beam – 49.47m (162 ft)
Decks – 18 (16 passenger accessible)
Speed – 22 knots (25 mph)
Capacity – 4,905 max passengers
Crew – 1,500

FELLOW PASSENGERS

We were told that there were approximately 3,600 Chinese passengers, approximately 500 British and 600 Australian passengers and a few from other Countries.

EMBARKATION

Embarkation in Shanghai was a very long and tiring process and one that I would not like to experience again. Our transfer driver dropped us off at the 'Baggage Drop Off' but we found that we then had to pull our cases several hundred yards before we joined a long queue to hand them over to the porters. Within the Departure Hall what followed was a complete shambles with queue after queue to have various documents checked by both Royal Caribbean Staff and Chinese Immigration and Customs. It would have been illegal in the UK to treat cattle the way we were treated in that hall (and, as Diamond members, we were using the priority lanes!). The whole process took us around two hours!

EMERGENCY DRILL

On this ship there were no life jackets in the cabins. In the event of an emergency we were required to make our way to the muster point on deck 5 where we would be issued with life jackets by a member of the crew. I thought that this was rather unsatisfactory as our obtaining life jackets (the most basic but most important safety items) relied on some other person(s) being where they should be – not always the case in an emergency. I would much prefer to have the life jackets available in our cabin.

At the Emergency Drill we made our way down to deck 5 and were directed into the Vintages Bar which was already very crowded. There was supposed to be a demonstration of putting the life jackets on by a member of crew but, although we could hear the instruction on the tannoy, we could not see any demonstration. Fortunately we have seen many RCI demonstrations, so knew the drill. But, all in all, a very poor show RCI, the worst drill we have experienced in over 30 cruises!!

DINING

For the first three evenings we ate in the 'Grande' main restaurant on Deck 3 but were very disappointed. The menu was an A3 sized paper with small pictures of each dish and its title in Chinese and English and resembled the menu in a UK greasy spoon cafe. Most of the choices were Chinese with a very limited choice of International dishes and a choice of just two desserts. When delivered to the table the food was generally lukewarm and rather unappetising. On the third day I ordered the filet mignon which was at an additional cost of $20. When it came it was cold and dry and had obviously been cooked some considerable time before – I sent it back. We had been talking to the couple on the next table, he was a vegetarian and had ordered a vegetarian dish and his wife had ordered a fish dish. They brought his dish first and he had finished it before his wife received her dish.

I had a word with the Maitre d', Jocelyn, a very helpful Filipino lady who suggested we tried the 'American Icon' restaurant the following night. When we went there on the fourth night we found that we had been allocated a reserved table with an excellent Chinese waiter named Longmao who always ensured that our dishes were fresh and piping hot. His assistant, Rangga, came from Indonesia and was also very good. Thereafter we had all our dinners in the 'American Icon' restaurant and were very satisfied with the food and service we received (although the menu was the same as the 'Grande' restaurant). The food was always served piping hot and there were no extended waits between courses being served. Our thanks to Jocelyn (the Maitre 'd), Helen (the Head Waiter) and Longmao and Rangga our waiters, for ensuring that we had a good dining experience.

We had the deluxe drinks package and this allowed us to have any drink up to the value of $12. Most of our drinking was done with meals and the staff were very good at keeping our glasses charged. We also enjoyed the freshly squeezed orange juice with our breakfasts, which were also part of our drinks package.

LOUNGES/BARS

There are a lot of lounges and bars throughout the ship, many with some kind of entertainment (pianist or band mostly) but sometimes it was rather difficult to find a seat as they were often very crowded. One evening, unable to find a seat in the lounge of our choice, we went into an adjacent lounge where Chinese karaoke was being held. There were some really excellent singers amongst the passengers and, whilst we couldn't understand the lyrics, we could enjoy the music and the singing.

ENTERTAINMENT

The entertainment was very mixed – some very good and some atrocious. The singers and dancers shows were very much in the usual Royal Caribbean style although I thought that they were a little weak with their male singers. The 'Highliner' shows were very mixed.

On day 1 there was a singers and dancers Production Show 'Sequins and Feathers' but we did not attend as it was the first night.

On Day 2 the 'Sequins and Feathers' show was repeated and so went to see it and found it to be reasonably entertaining.

On Day 3 there was a performance by two singers, William Elliot and Lauren Marshall who took it in turn to sing and were probably very good, but their microphone volumes were far too loud which distorted their performance (especially hers).

On day 4 there were two comedians named 'Funnybones', silly slapstick type of humour who were just not funny and we left the theatre after about 10 minutes, as did many other people.

Day 5 was movies (indoor and outdoor) but we didn't go to either.

Day 6 was a magic show featuring the magic of Kai-Lun Hu, but the only really successful trick he performed was to make the audience disappear.

On Day 7 we went to see the 'Starwater Show' that was held in the Two70 degrees lounge in the early evening. This show was a mixture of singing, dancing, gymnastics and special effects. Whilst the individual aspects of it were very good, I didn't think that it gelled together well and I couldn't understand the theme or the storyline at all. Having said that, Chris enjoyed it more than me. In the late evening we went to see the headliner show featuring a singer from Jamaica, Monique Dehaney and she was absolutely superb. Her show made up for some of the lack-lustre shows that we had experienced on this cruise.

Day 8 was another Production show 'Sonic Odyssey' which again, whilst being entertaining, for me did not tell a story (but perhaps I am the one at fault).

Chris and I only attended one trivia quiz (normally we are quite keen quizzers, although very, very rarely win!). The quiz was being conducted by one of the Chinese entertainments staff and some of the questions were quite unique. “What three keys cannot you put in your pockets?” was one. We racked our brains but could only come up with the Florida Keys and we could see that the other teams were having difficulty with this one. The answers were......wait for it.....”Donkey, Monkey and Turkey”!!!! Nobody got full marks in that quiz.

THE PORTS

17th September - Osaka

On day 3 we sailed into Osaka at 2:00pm, our first taste of Japan. I believe that our visit to Osaka was to clear Japanese Customs and Immigration which we were told would take some considerable time. We were to leave the ship in batches, determined by a card that we had been issued with. Our card, for Group No. 9, was timed for 3:20pm and we had to queue for about 10 or 15 minutes before we were allowed off the ship and into the Terminal building. In the event we found that it was not such an onerous procedure (certainly not compared with Chinese Immigration) and we were processed very quickly. We had had our passports taken off us at embarkation in Shanghai and in their places had photocopies of them which the Japanese Immigration attached a temporary visa. We had to keep the photocopy on our person whenever we were ashore in Japan.

We had hoped to have gone on a ship's excursion to Osaka Castle but, weeks before the sailing date. it disappeared from the RCI website. It reappeared briefly once we were on the ship, but by the time we applied we were too late. As we knew that it would be quite late in the afternoon by the time we got off the ship, we decided to just go ashore and follow our noses. Very close to where the ship was berthed there was a very large shopping mall so we decided to have a look around it. It was quite interesting as there was a street entertainer outside the mall and, once inside, we saw a team of comical actors amusing a gathering crowd. We did a bit of window shopping – surprisingly the prices seemed to be very reasonable (we were later told that many of the Chinese passengers were on this cruise to go shopping in Japan. Certainly we saw several Chinese passengers returning to the ship with microwave ovens and other large items). We tried some Japanese ice cream which was absolutely delicious before we returned to the ship.

The ship sailed at 4:00 am to go to Kobe which was just across on the other side of the bay, arriving at 7:00 am.

18th September - Kobe

We had booked the 'Mount Rokko and Sake Museum and Brewery' ship's tour, so assembled in the Music Hall on decks 3 and 4 before disembarking and boarding No. 10 coach that was parked very close to the ship. Our male guide was Sudo San (Sudo being his family name, his given name was Katzeturo) and he proved to be very good.

We drove up the steep roads of Mount Rokko National Park with very scenic views until we reached the Rokko Garden Terrace where we had 60 minutes of free time to enjoy the gardens and the views looking down over the city and Osaka Bay.

The coach then took us a short distance and dropped us where we had a short walk to the Cable Car upper station. The retro Cable Car is actually a type of funicular railway as the cars run on railway tracks for the steep 493m descent which takes about 10 minutes. When we reached the lower station our coach was waiting to take us on to the sake Museum.

The Hakutsuru Sake Brewery Museum was very interesting and it took us through all the processes of producing sake, illustrated by models and excellent displays. At the end we were treated to several small 'shots' of various sakes, some infused with oranges (my favourite) and plums.

From the Museum we were then driven back to the ship. I was a little disappointed with this tour as, when we had booked it (several months before) the tour had included a visit to an ancient shrine. However, shortly after we booked it the visit to the shrine disappeared from the itinerary, with no reason being given. I felt that Royal Caribbean should have advised us of this change.

19th September – Yokohama

On the original itinerary we were due to visit Shimizu (for Mount Fuji) which Chris and I had been looking forward to. On the 1st November 2017 Royal Caribbean wrote to us, via the Travel Agent, to
advise us that Shimizu had been dropped and replaced by Yokohama (with a stay in the harbour overnight). The reason given was ….. “On this occasion, we had to alter the ships itinerary in order to enhance the cruise experience”. Hmmmm!!!!

Today we were on the “Yokohama Cultural Tour” with a male guide named Kazu who also proved to be excellent. Our first visit was to the Sankeien Garden which was created by a Yokohama business man named Sankei Hara who had made a fortune from trading silk. The garden is approximately 175,000 sqm in size and is located in a valley facing Tokyo Bay. There are two parts to the garden – the outer garden that was opened to the public in 1906 and the inner private garden that was used by Sankei Hara himself. The garden has a large lake and 17 historic structures (temples and buildings associated with historic figures) that have been gathered from places all over Japan. The gardens were beautiful and the buildings very decorative and interesting and, to make it even better, there were two pairs of Japanese newly-weds in their lovely traditional kimonos, there to have their photographs taken.

From the gardens we were driven into Yokohama city and were given 60 minutes free time to explore the city's Chinatown district which is enclosed within streets having huge Chinese arches. There appeared to be some excellent restaurants here but, as is so often the case on excursions, there was insufficient time to have a proper meal. But the street snacks were popular with many people and the shops, as always, were interesting and colourful to browse round.

From Chinatown we were driven to the Yokohama Landmark Tower, the second tallest building in Japan at almost 300m high and has the country's fastest elevator travelling at a maximum speed of 750 metres per minute. It travels from the 2nd floor to the 69th floor in just 40 seconds. The huge windows on the 69th floor afforded us fantastic views over the City and its surrounding areas. Back on ground level we boarded our coach again and were driven back to the ship. We remained berthed in the harbour overnight.

20th September – Yokohama (for Tokyo)

Our ship's tour today was the “Tokyo Cultural Highlights” tour and we had a female guide named Norika. We were driven to the Imperial Palace in Tokyo. Building it was commenced in 1590 by the first Shogun Tokugawa, but was made into the world's largest castle during the Edo period (1603 – 1868), although only the inner circle remains now. The original Palace was destroyed by bombing during Word war 2 but it has since been rebuilt and the current Emperor Akihito lives there with his family. We were not able to go into the actual grounds, but were able to view the main gate and the Nijubashi bridge in the time that was available to us.

Leaving the Imperial Palace we passed the Ginza shopping district and the very high Skytree Tower and were driven to the impressive Senso-ji Temple complex, Tokyo's most sacred and spectacular Temple. In 628 AD two fishermen fished a small gold statue of Kannon, the Buddhist goddess of mercy, from the Sumida River. They put it back in the River but kept re-catching it. Their master built a shrine to Kannon, then in 645, the holy man Shokai built a Temple to her on the site. The Temple survived the 1923 earthquake but was destroyed by bombers in World war 2. It was rebuilt, so its main buildings are relatively new, but follow the original layout and design. The buildings are very decorative and colourful and there is a beautiful five storey Pagoda to see. Quite a few of the Japanese visitors to the Temple were wearing traditional dress and kimonos which was very pleasant to see. There is a shopping arcade at the Temple where you can buy traditional Japanese items and art. From the Temple we were driven back to the ship, with Norika telling all about the customs and ways of life of the Japanese people.

23rd SEPTEMBER - DISEMBARKATION

We left the ship at around 8:30am and had the usual queues and delays to get through Chinese Immigration and Customs. When we collected our two suitcases we could not see any trolleys or porters but could see that there were some coaches just outside the warehouse. We had booked the “Panoramic Shanghai with Airport Drop-off” excursion, but soon found that the coaches were not for us. We were directed to go to a person in the far distance who was holding a ship's banner up and, when we got there, pulling our trolleys, were directed to go to another person in the far distance. We were passed from person to person until we finally got to our coach which must have been parked at least half a mile from the Terminal building. We were absolutely exhausted by the time we settled into our seats on the coach.

Our experiences of the rest of our day in Shanghai are covered in a separate report - “Two (Separate) Days in Shanghai”.

CONCLUSIONS

This cruise was very different from any other Royal Caribbean cruises we have been on (and we have been on a fair number). When we got on the ship it was clear that the cruise was designed for the Chinese market and I sometimes got the feeling that the non Chinese passengers were a bit of an inconvenience to the Line. We had done our research by reading other cruise review website reviews and so had an inkling of what to expect, but it would have come as a bit of a shock to anybody that had not. We had been advised to treat the cruise as an adventure, which we did, and so were well prepared.

The Chinese culture is very different from ours and queueing was very different from what we are used to, with many people trying to sneak in or barge past. When a lift arrived people would barge in as soon as the door opened, leaving the passengers who were alighting having to try and squeeze out of the lift.

The cuisine was very much biased towards Chinese dishes with even the few 'International ' dishes sometimes having oriental flavours. The menus were presented in the Chinese style, consisting of tiny pictures of each dish with a title in Chinese and in English on an A3 sheet of card – very common in China, but more likely to be seen in a 'greasy spoon' cafe in the West. Fortunately Chris and I like Chinese food, but it would have been difficult for anybody that did not.

I fully understand that this was a cruise from and to China, and I expected the majority of the passengers to be Chinese, but I think that both Royal Caribbean and the Travel Agent should have advised us of how different it would be from other Royal Caribbean cruises. We have sailed with Royal Caribbean all over the world, including Europe, the Caribbean, Australasia and South America and have always experienced the same standards of cuisine and service etc. When this is radically changed I believe that there is an onus on the cruise company and their agents to advise us accordingly.

The “Quantum of the Seas” is not my favourite Royal Caribbean ship as I found the geometry of the ship somewhat odd. I am used to ships with either two sets of lifts (fore and aft) or three sets of lifts (fore, amidships and aft). This ship has two sets of lifts but they are fore and amidships, i.e. no aft lifts, which seemed to involve a lot more walking. The ship also has no atrium, although I suspect that these are gradually disappearing from modern ships.

I have always admired the main dining rooms on the Royal Caribbean ships that we have sailed on – huge multi tiered rooms that have a 'Wow' factor when you enter them. The main dining rooms on this ship were single storey and, in my opinion, not nearly as impressive. The low ceilings also made them somewhat noisy.

There is no doubt that this ship has some amazing features and technology, but I personally prefer a smaller and more traditional ship. Things like the Bionic Bar with its robotic bartenders are, in my opinion, a gimmick and are not what I go on a cruise for, I prefer to be pampered with good old fashioned service. On other ships, on sitting in a lounge or bar, we have almost always been attended very quickly by a waiter. On this ship we usually had to catch the attention of a waiter (even when they were not busy).

However, the cabin was the best one that we have experienced in all the many ships we have sailed in. The amount of storage was outstanding, utilising the space above the bed for lockers, similar to those found in caravans, so it was very easy to keep the cabin looking tidy. There were plenty of electrical sockets and it was good to have two USB sockets. However, I believe that the voltage of the sockets should be marked or labelled on all ships (some ships have both 110V and 230V sockets). Soundproofing was excellent and we never heard a single sound from our neighbouring cabins. The balcony door had a unique locking feature that I haven't seen before. When the door is locked with the large handle the whole door drops and forms a really good seal, preventing any wind noises from disturbing our peace and quiet.

Did we enjoy the cruise? Yes, but would we do it again? No. Both Chris and I have mobility issues and found the whole package (pre-stay in China, the cruise itself and the post cruise day in Shanghai) very tiring. There was a lot of walking and the very long queueing for Customs and Immigration were very tiring for us. Had we had normal mobility it would have been much better, although even the younger and fitter passengers said how tired they were on occasions. But we survived and can colour in two more countries on our World map!
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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Postby Gillzajoker » 05 Oct 2018 14:44

Very interesting and informative review, Geoff. Sorry to hear you had quite
a few disappointments along the way, but with true British spirit you made
the best of it! :D
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Re: "QUANTUM OF THE SEAS" CRUISE REVIEW

Postby khkate » 06 Oct 2018 10:46

An interesting experience - thanks for sharing.
CRUISES BOOKED:
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Spirit of Adventure - September 2020, March 2021, June 2021, October 2021
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Postby Jimmy the One » 06 Oct 2018 16:12

Thanks for your honest review Geoff reinforces my view of large ships even with all their high tech toys not for me
Im just a soul whose intentions are good Oh lord please dont let me be misunderstood

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Postby Dave » 06 Oct 2018 18:36

Thanks for providing such an interesting and thorough review Geoff. :clap:

I spotted it this morning in North Wales and planned to read it properly as soon as we got home (well, almost as soon) - which I did. :angel: :D

I don't know why, but I've always thought of you as a 'small ship cruiser' and something like Quantum of the Seas (a misnomer if ever there was!) seemed rather incongruous. I admit I knew little about this ship, but your photos of bumper cars, etc. gave me an idea of what she might be like. Neither of us has any desire to visit Japan but there are parts of China we'd love to see - a river cruise on the Yangtze is still on the wish list!
Dave

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Remaining land-based holidays 2019: July - Peak District, August - Harris and Highlands, October - Brecon Beacons
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Postby grannyM » 07 Oct 2018 18:50

I haven't actually read the whole review yet Geoff, still the ports to read tomorrow. However I really had to make this comment about your Embarkation because I do sympathise.

We had a similar experience here at QE11 dock in Southampton when boarding Emerald Princess some years ago. Obviously, because of the size of Quantum and the difficulty you had with the Chinese customs, I cannot say that it was the same as your experience but it was the worst embarkation we have ever had. This was mainly due to the inefficiency of Princess' ground staff and such a small area for baggage drop off and check in. Granted they were relocated from the published embarkation dock (Mayfair) but they were completely overwhelmed and did not handle it at all well.

After waiting in a long queue outside on the dock and negotiating our suitcases up a steep ramp to the level of actual check-in we encountered another disorganised huge snake of a queue in what looked like an end of cruise baggage recovery area. When we eventually reached the actual check in room this is what we saw.

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Believe it or not, although you can't tell from this photo, it was sectioned by the usual flow barriers. The left of the picture is supposed to be 'priority' which was just a joke. It was extremely hot in that area and would definitely not have passed H&S. We did feel like cattle. We arrived at 2pm and it was almost 5pm before we were actually on the ship. Never ever again will we board a ship which is leaving from QE11 dock and in actual fact cancelled another Princess cruise for the following year when we checked the Southampton cruise diary.
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Re: "QUANTUM OF THE SEAS" CRUISE REVIEW

Postby Camela » 07 Oct 2018 19:27

Thanks for the fascinating info, photos and review about this cruise, it must have taken you ages Geoff. IT is good to read a 'warts and all' account from an experienced cruiser such as yourself. Embarkation did sound tiring and stressful. As you say the cruises in China are clearly designed around the local population and it is an unfortunate fact that they don't have the same idea of queuing as others. You can understand that some excursions have to be changed but it seems to have happened too much to you and others, very disappointing. Probably good that you've experienced Quantum so know to book smaller next time. As you say RC do mainly do things very well.
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Postby judgegeoff » 07 Oct 2018 19:29

grannyM wrote:I haven't actually read the whole review yet Geoff, still the ports to read tomorrow. However I really had to make this comment about your Embarkation because I do sympathise.

We had a similar experience here at QE11 dock in Southampton when boarding Emerald Princess some years ago. Obviously, because of the size of Quantum and the difficulty you had with the Chinese customs, I cannot say that it was the same as your experience but it was the worst embarkation we have ever had. This was mainly due to the inefficiency of Princess' ground staff and such a small area for baggage drop off and check in. Granted they were relocated from the published embarkation dock (Mayfair) but they were completely overwhelmed and did not handle it at all well.

After waiting in a long queue outside on the dock and negotiating our suitcases up a steep ramp to the level of actual check-in we encountered another disorganised huge snake of a queue in what looked like an end of cruise baggage recovery area. When we eventually reached the actual check in room this is what we saw.

Image


Believe it or not, although you can't tell from this photo, it was sectioned by the usual flow barriers. The left of the picture is supposed to be 'priority' which was just a joke. It was extremely hot in that area and would definitely not have passed H&S. We did feel like cattle. We arrived at 2pm and it was almost 5pm before we were actually on the ship. Never ever again will we board a ship which is leaving from QE11 dock and in actual fact cancelled another Princess cruise for the following year when we checked the Southampton cruise diary.


It always surprises me that we allow people to be treated worse than cattle at Cruise Terminals! I suppose it is in part due to the huge increase in the size and passenger capacity of modern cruise ships - on our "Quantum of the Seas" cruise there were over 6,000 people on the ship, not many less than reside in our town. Modern terror threats (perceived or real) have added tremendously to the delays and crowding at these Terminals. Then, when you factor in the Chinese obsession with security and the lack of queueing mentality of the people there, it is no wonder that chaos abounded on our recent visit.

One cruise that does appeal to me is cruising the Adriatic in small motor yachts from Dubrovnik. Typically they have 30 passengers in 15 cabins, looked after by a crew of 5 or 6. They cruise during the day, stopping occasionally to anchor in a bay, to allow the passengers to swim. Breakfast and a big lunch are served aboard and then each late afternoon/early evening the boat berths in a harbour (sometimes in a small fishing village) for the night. The passengers eat dinner ashore, although the reviews all state that the big lunch ensures that the passengers don't need a huge meal in the evening. It sounds very relaxing and ideal for me and I am certainly going to look into it. :)
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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Postby tobysgranny » 08 Oct 2018 09:15

Really enjoyed your review Geoff. You always make such an effort to share your experiences.

You may remember we were on The Quantum when she was very new. This was a repositioning cruise from New York to Shanghai. We joined the ship and completed two b2b cruises from Barcelona to Dubai and Dubai to Singapore.

We had a wonderful cruise and loved the ship very much and met some lovely people. In those days you selected where you wanted to dine in advance, but that went out the window on board as we joined some other people and we would make our minds up at the last minute where to go. This worked well. the menus were all the usual RCI and there was a wonderful Asian restaurant.

However, after leaving Dubai the ship gradually became more ‘Chinese’. There was also a large amount of young Chinese staff arriving on board which involved a lot of training and even the signage changed to Chinese. There were many, many more Chinese on board and we also experienced what we would call rudeness in the West. It was obvious the ship was being changed to suit the high roller Chinese gamblers. Even the shops on board were all high end designer shops with more opening during the cruise. Surprisingly there were lots of people using these shops and spending lots of money.

We had a wonderful time but I don’t think if we cruised on this ship again we would enjoy it nearly as much, but it’s safe to say this ship just blew me away and I loved everything about it.

Joan

P.s. When we boarded in Barcelona it was also very chaotic and took a very long time. There were lots of disgruntled passengers.
Queen Victoria Nov. 2018.
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Re: "QUANTUM OF THE SEAS" CRUISE REVIEW

Postby Camela » 10 Oct 2018 23:14

The bean counters will play to where their income is going to come from and the Chinese have an awful lot of the spondulicks. Just means you have to do a lot of homework on the cruise line sites to ascertain whether the cruise caters for your market.
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