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MEMORIES (No. 9) - AEGEAN CRUISE - 2015

Re: MEMORIES (No. 9) - AEGEAN CRUISE - 2015

Postby Camela » 27 Oct 2020 10:09

It is satisfying to enjoy a DIY excursion when there is so much of interest to see.
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MEMORIES (No. 9) - AEGEAN CRUISE - 2015

Postby grannyM » 27 Oct 2020 11:42

A really good, if tiring, day for you both Geoff. I really liked the look of Canakkale. Such beautiful architecture. :thumbup:

Just the sort of port visit that we love. Great to just walk around and get an idea of the history and the lives of people who live there. :clap:
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Postby Gillzajoker » 27 Oct 2020 12:12

That sounds like a wonderful day, Geoff, plenty of sights to capture interest, and all done at youor
own pace. Regarding the mine-layer, one of m;y favourite songs is about the tragedy of Gallipolli,
"And the Band Pllayed Waltzing Mathilda" by Eric Bogle (but my favourite is by Mike Harding. If
you don't know it, please check it out as I find it very moving, even after hundreds of playings, of
the abominations that occurred back then. :D
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Postby judgegeoff » 27 Oct 2020 12:50

Gillzajoker wrote:That sounds like a wonderful day, Geoff, plenty of sights to capture interest, and all done at youor
own pace. Regarding the mine-layer, one of m;y favourite songs is about the tragedy of Gallipolli,
"And the Band Pllayed Waltzing Mathilda" by Eric Bogle (but my favourite is by Mike Harding. If
you don't know it, please check it out as I find it very moving, even after hundreds of playings, of
the abominations that occurred back then. :D

I have just watched the film "1917" about the battle of Passchendaele during WWW1 and it underlined the horror of trench warfare conducted by generals who were promoted because of who they were rather than their ability. Nowadays, an individual enemy can be obliterated by a missile directed by a man sitting in front of a computer screen in Hereford. Such is progress!!!
Geoff

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MEMORIES (No. 9) - AEGEAN CRUISE - 2015

Postby judgegeoff » 28 Oct 2020 08:15

Day 4 - Saturday 26th September 2015 – Dikili, Turkey


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We had a fairly early breakfast and then made our way off the ship to explore the town of Dikili which was just a hop, skip and jump from the “Voyager”.

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Off the ship, along the pier and we were in the town.

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Port of Dikili.

Dikili was a much less touristy place than Canakkale, very few people spoke any english and during our whole time there we didn't find a cafe that sold western style coffees (cappuccino or americano). The town had still not woken up when we left the ship, but slowly the shutters were lifted and the town became alive. Like many of the other passengers, we were looking for a very old wooden Mosque, constructed without the use of nails, that port lecturer John Coventry had told us about. However, we couldn't find the old Mosque although we did find a stone-built Mosque in the general area. (We later found out that the stone Mosque had been built around the old wooden Mosque to protect it. Had we entered the new Mosque we would have found the old Mosque inside it. Later on in the cruise we had lunch with John Coventry and his wife Claire and he told us that the stone Mosque had been built since he had last visited the Mosque. Claire ran handicraft lessons on the few sea days we had).

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Dikili’s public telephones were rather odd.

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These dolphin phones looked a little friendlier.

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Our ship, as seen from the end of the promenade.

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I have no idea what this ‘rock on wheels’ by the promenade was supposed to represent.

We walked along the promenade and stopped for drinks at the “Levant Cafe and Restaurant”, a beachfront restaurant that gave us lovely views of the little harbour and our ship. Chris ordered a glass of Turkish tea with no milk but two sugar lumps and said it was very enjoyable and tasted not unlike rooibos tea. I ordered Turkish coffee which came in a small espresso type cup. It was very strong and appeared to be two-thirds coffee grounds and just one-third liquid – I was brushing grounds out of my teeth for several days. :lol: The waiter also brought us a bottle of chilled mineral water and two glasses, a thing that seemed to be the norm in Turkey and Greece. When I went to pay for our drinks the waiter said “Two lira”, but took three lira from the change in my hand. As this equated to about just 65p we thought that it was excellent value. We did consider having lunch at the restaurant, but were rather put off by the “Crap Salad” on the menu.

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We picked a table where we could keep an eye on the ship.

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Bedford Bear was amused by my gritty coffee.

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We wouldn’t recommend Yengel Salatasi.

Refreshed, we decided to explore the town and walked inland where we found some little streets with picturesque (if somewhat neglected) houses. The footpaths were paved with rough stones which made progress rather slow, but at least we saw more of the town and the local way of life.

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I think that there must be a statue of Kemel Ataturk, founder of the Republic of Turkey, in every Turkish town and village.

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A local fruit and vegetable shop.

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Not a very prosperous town.

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Some of the cobbled paths were a little difficult to walk on.

We visited an indoor market selling some tasty looking fresh vegetables and fruit plus some local cheeses, but had to dodge the scooters and mopeds that the locals were riding at speed around the market whilst shopping.

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The indoor market.

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There was a good selection of fruit and vegetables in the market.

We returned to the waterfront where Chris bought a very nice hand-crocheted/knitted shawl for about £5, an excellent bargain. She had felt a little cool whilst sat in 'Scott's Bar' on the ship the previous evening, so was quite pleased to find a shawl that she liked.

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Dikili’s small boat marina.

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The Coastguard Offices, with 2 fast patrol boats moored outside.

We returned to the ship in time to have an excellent three-course lunch in the 'Discovery Restaurant' followed by a walk around the decks. We went to the pool area where the crew had left some towel animals, including this crocodile, swan and turtle.

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The towel animals.

Chris had a swim whilst I read a book and sunbathed. Chris said the water felt cold when she first got in the pool, but was quite pleasant once she had been in a minute or so. The pool was only 1.4 metres deep so Chris was able to stand for once (she is very small!). After her swim, she spent some time in one of the hot tubs, although it was not very hot and there were not too many bubbles. We then went back down to our cabin where we showered and got ready for dinner, which we ate at 6:30 pm.

After dinner, we went to the 'Lookout Lounge' to participate in the Trivia Quiz run by Emma the Cruise Director. We were joined by our table companions from dinner, Barbara and Paul. We did quite well, 13 out of 15 and tied for first place with another group, but they answered the tie-breaker question quicker than us, so they got the ship's pens prizes. At 9:30 pm we made our way to the 'Darwin Lounge' to watch a show named “American Bandstand”, presented by the ship's singers and dancers. It was very good and we thoroughly enjoyed it.

After the show, we had a quick look in the shop before having a walk on the Promenade deck and retiring to bed.


========================================


Continued tomorrow ………...
Geoff

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"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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Postby Gillzajoker » 28 Oct 2020 11:00

Lovely photos giving an insight into a 'normal' town. Sometimes it's nice to just mooch around a place
rather than rush from one attraction to another, but it's a shame you missed the wooden mosque. :D
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Postby judgegeoff » 28 Oct 2020 11:40

Gillzajoker wrote:Lovely photos giving an insight into a 'normal' town. Sometimes it's nice to just mooch around a place
rather than rush from one attraction to another, but it's a shame you missed the wooden mosque. :D

Thanks Gill, yes, a real shame, especially as I don't believe that Dikili is a very common cruise ship destination, so it is unlikely that we will ever get back there again.
Geoff

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MEMORIES (No. 9) - AEGEAN CRUISE - 2015

Postby judgegeoff » 29 Oct 2020 08:38

Day 5 - Sunday 27th September 2015 – At sea


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After breakfast in the 'Discovery restaurant,' we attended another lecture by John Coventry in the 'Darwin Lounge', this one entitled “Antalya” (our next port of call). It was very informative and covered the places and sights (rather than the shops, like some American lines). After the port lecture, we had time to grab speciality coffees in one of the bars before returning to the Lounge for a lecture titled “The Trojan War” presented by another lecturer, Major General Stephen Carr-Smith. The General was a fantastic lecturer, we really enjoyed his talk and looked forward to his remaining lectures. Like most small ships, the “Voyager” did not have a dedicated theatre and so the ‘Darwin Lounge’, the largest room in the ship, was used for lectures, shows and dancing etc.

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Maj. General Stephen Carr-Smith.

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The ‘Darwin Lounge’ was not tiered seating (except at the sides), so we always went to the lectures and shows early, to ensure that we got a good seat.

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We usually sat in these seats at the side of the dance floor.

One of the main complaints of this ship, in the past, had been that passengers not attending the room had to pass through it to reach other parts of the ship, disruptive to both the lecturers and singers and dancers as well as the audience. Prior to our cruise, an enclosed walkway had been created along one side of the room to keep the pedestrians out of the room. Although it had reduced the size of the lounge a little, it was very much welcomed by passengers who had sailed on the ship before.

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You can see the walkway behind the elevated seating at the side of the lounge.

In an anteroom off the ‘Darwin Lounge,’ there was a room with displays of the history of cruising. I was delighted to see a picture of the “SS Dunera” (the first ship, apart from ferries) I sailed on in 1962!

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Part of the display.

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The picture of the “SS Dunera”.

Leaving the Lounge we collected our daily sudoku and trivia sheets from the Library (there were always plenty of copies available unlike on some ships). The Library was very large for such a small ship – we have seen smaller libraries on some of the mega-ships!

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The ship’s large Library.

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Another view of the Library.

We left the ‘Darwin Lounge’ and then went for lunch in the 'Discovery Restaurant'. After lunch we returned to the 'Darwin Lounge' for another port lecture by John Coventry, this time about “Kusadasi and Patmos”- the usual high standard was maintained. Chris left halfway through as she wanted to fit a swim in and I joined her on the Pool deck afterwards. It was very hot, so we had to be rather careful that we didn't get sunburnt.

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The little pool was filled with fresh filtered and treated water every night.

After showering and changing we went for dinner and were shown to a table for four. Our Trivia Quiz friends, Barbara and Paul, were coincidentally also shown to our table – on a small ship coincidences like this are not that rare – it would never happen on the mega-ships we have been on. The "Voyager" only had a capacity of 540 passengers. After dinner, together with Barbara and Paul, we went to the Trivia Quiz but didn't do quite so well as before (just 8 out of 15) as many of the questions were Spanish themed for some reason. The quizzes were usually UK themed but were much harder than the usual cruise ship quiz questions.

When the Trivia Quiz ended Chris and I went to the 'Darwin Lounge' (yet again!) to see the show “Cafe Swing” by the ship's singers and dancers which was very good. We went out onto the Promenade deck for our usual walk before retiring to bed, stopping at the 'Guest relations/Reception' desk to buy shuttle tickets for Antalya tomorrow. The Captain had warned us that we might experience some rough weather today, but it had not materialised and the seas remained very calm, ensuring us a tranquil passage.


====================================


Continued tomorrow …………………...
Geoff

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"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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Postby Gillzajoker » 29 Oct 2020 10:59

Like you Geoff, I always enjoy informative Port Lectures, and others of interest if they are well-presented.
(One lecturer insisted that the Queen Mother was called Elizabeth Parker-Bowles, and got various oher facts
wrong as well, so didn't bother with any more of those.
A good idea to arrive early to get a good seat. The walkway to bypass the Lounge is an excellent idea, as
'through traffic' is a distraction for all concerned. And how lovely that the history display included an
'old friend'!
I have found that on American ships, Trivia is very US-orientated - and contain some really stupid questions
at times. One that still sticks out in my mind is, "How many calories does it take to lick a stamp!" And yet
again I am enjoying your photos. :D
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Postby judgegeoff » 29 Oct 2020 12:30

Gillzajoker wrote:Like you Geoff, I always enjoy informative Port Lectures, and others of interest if they are well-presented.
(One lecturer insisted that the Queen Mother was called Elizabeth Parker-Bowles, and got various oher facts
wrong as well, so didn't bother with any more of those.
A good idea to arrive early to get a good seat. The walkway to bypass the Lounge is an excellent idea, as
'through traffic' is a distraction for all concerned. And how lovely that the history display included an
'old friend'!
I have found that on American ships, Trivia is very US-orientated - and contain some really stupid questions
at times.
One that still sticks out in my mind is, "How many calories does it take to lick a stamp!" And yet
again I am enjoying your photos. :D


Thank you Gill. In September 2018 Chris and I went on a 'Quantum of the Seas' cruise from Shanghai to Japan and the passengers were mainly Chinese, as were the Entertainment crew. The English trivia quiz was run by a Chinese lady and some of her questions were most amusing;- "What 3 keys are so large that you can't put them in your pocket?" We racked our brains and came up with the Florida Keys and a keystone, but could not think of another answer. It was clear that other teams were also struggling with this one and nobody got it right. The answer, when it came, was "Donkey, monkey and turkey"!!!!!

On another cruise one of the questions was about mushrooms and the answer was 'shiitake mushrooms' and the crew member pronounced it as "Sh*t ache Mushrooms". The whole room dissolved into uncontrollable laughter!
Geoff

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