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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby Gillzajoker » 26 Feb 2021 17:01

No, Geoff, not bored at all. It is interesting to hear what is available, and as always you show
some excellent photos. The Pyramid Lounge looks quite spectacular, but you wouldn't catch
me on the FlowRide as I can't swim. Personally, the Royal Promenade doesn't do a thing for
me - f I wanted to go on a street or to a mall, I'd stay on land. But some people love it, so
it's swings and roundabouts. I used to attend almost every single lecture going, as on a TA the
chances of being able to get some sunbathing in are minimal, so it usually passes a pleasant
45 mins. :D
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby judgegeoff » 27 Feb 2021 19:02

My apologies for being late today, but I was unable to post this morning.


Day 10 - Sunday 10th November 2014 - Day at sea

Our last sea day before reaching the Caribbean islands!

Arne and Sue were having a lie-in this morning, so Chris and I went to the Main Dining Room on deck 4 for an a la carte breakfast and Chris had an Eggs Benedict which she loves. I had the full English with almost everything available on the menu.

After breakfast, we had a mooch around the shop, went out to watch passengers on the Flowrider and then went to the Diamond Lounge for speciality coffees. We then sat on deck for a while before playing a round of mini-golf which I won by 4 holes (but then I used to play golf when we lived in Zambia).

At 1:15 pm we went to the theatre to attend Robert Schirn’s lecture “The Kidnapping of Patty Hearst” which was extremely interesting. Patty was an actress who was the granddaughter of American publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst and was kidnapped on the 4th of February 1974 by the left-wing organisation the Symbionese Liberation Army. After being held a prisoner for some time, Patty was indoctrinated into the organisation and took part in an armed robbery of a bank on the 15th of April 1974, followed by further bank robberies.

On the 18th September 1975, Patti was arrested and faced trial in January 1976 and she was found guilty of bank robbery and using a firearm during the commission of a felony. She was lucky not to have been charged with murder as, at one of the bank robberies, a customer had been shot dead by one of the gang. She was sentenced to 35 years in prison that was then reduced to 7 years.

President Jimmy Carter commuted Hearst's federal sentence to the 22 months served, freeing her eight months before she was eligible for her first parole hearing. Her release (on February 1st, 1979) was under stringent conditions, and she remained on probation. She recovered full civil rights when President Bill Clinton granted her a pardon on January 20, 2001, his last day in office.

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Patty Hearst.

After the lecture, we went to the ice rink at Studio B to watch another ice skating show titled “Strings”. As before, it was a very exciting and enjoyable show.

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“Strings”.

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Great action.

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Very skilled!

After the show, we went up to deck 12 to have a late lunch in the ‘Johnny Rockets’ American diner.

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‘Johnny Rockets’ diner.

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This is the outside section where we sat…..

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….and this is the inside section.

Ever 30 minutes or so the diner plays the tune ‘Stayin Alive” and the waiters and other staff stop what they are doing and start dancing to the music. It is great fun and very popular with diners.

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The dancing waiters.

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Whilst Arne tucks into his burger.

Leaving the diner, we went down to our cabin and found that our laundry, submitted the day before, had returned, all clean and pressed. We also found that our cabin steward had changed the mattress as I had found the original one too soft, causing me leg and back ache. I slept much better thereafter.

After showering and dressing we went up to the Viking Crown Lounge where we met up with Arne and Sue for our drinks. Arne and Sue did not want any dinner (they were still full after ‘Johnny Rockets’, so Chris and I went to the early sitting for dinner, but only had starters and desserts as we too were fairly full.

After dinner, we went for a walk on the decks and then sat in Schooners bar for a while.

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Schooners Bar.

We then went to the theatre to see the ship’s singers and dancers in a show “Under The Big Top” which we had already seen on our 2011 cruise on the ship, but was certainly worth seeing again. Its theme was the circus and we really enjoyed it again.

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Waiting for the show to start.

At the end of the show Cruise Director, Tim Connor, came on stage to advise that he was going to have to leave the ship in St. Maarten as his wife had been taken seriously ill. They lived in Orlando in Florida and his wife had been taken into hospital as we had left Southampton, but her condition had been deteriorating as the cruise progressed. His assistant, Jamie would be taking over his Cruise Director duties.

After the show, we retired to our cabin for the night. In the morning we would be reaching our first destination, St. Maarten in the Caribbean.


==================================================


Continued tomorrow ……………..
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby judgegeoff » 28 Feb 2021 08:19

Day 11 – Monday 10th November 2014 - St. Maarten, Caribbean.


The ship arrived in St. Maarten, an island in the Caribbean, at about 7:00 am.

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The location of St. Maarten.

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St. Maarten.

Sint Maarten, part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, is on the southern part of a Caribbean island shared with Saint Martin, a French overseas collectivity. Its natural features span lagoons, beaches and salt pans. The capital, Philipsburg, has cobblestone streets and colourful, colonial-style buildings lining its Front Street shopping area. The port is a popular cruise-ship stop

The small Caribbean island is unique in that it is divided into two separate parts – the northern part, Saint Martin, is French whilst the southern part, Sint Maarten, is Dutch. Originally inhabited by Amerindian people, it became under Spanish rule in the late 15th century,

Nominally Spanish territory, the island became the focus of the competing interest of the European powers, notably France, Britain and the Netherlands. While the French wanted to colonize the islands between Trinidad and Bermuda, the Dutch found San Martín a convenient halfway point between their colonies in New Amsterdam (present-day New York) and New Holland. Meanwhile, the Amerindian population began to decline precipitously, dying from introduced diseases to which they had no immunity.

The Dutch built a fort on the island in 1631, but the island was recaptured by the Spanish in 1633. In 1648, at the end of the Eighty Years War, the Spanish saw no point in retaining the island and both the French and the Dutch re-established their presence on the island. Several minor skirmishes followed leading to the Treaty of Concordia in 1648 which divided the island in two.

There is a lovely story that, to divide the island, a Frenchman and a Dutchman set off walking along the coast in opposite directions and, where they met, would determine a point where, with a line drawn from there to the starting point, would establish the new border. The Dutch tried to slow the Frenchman down by leaving some wine on his route whilst the French tried to slow the Dutchman down by having an attractive young lady meet him on his route. Who knows? Perhaps the Frenchman ran rather than walked or perhaps the Dutchman was delayed by the whiles of the young lady, but the French part is somewhat bigger than the Dutch part.

====================================

We had breakfast in the Main Dining Room at 8:30 am and then left the ship to explore St. Maarten. It was quite a distance from the port to the town of Philipsburg, so we decided to take a water taxi and purchased all-day tickets for US$7 each.

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Leaving the ship. The P&O ship “Azura” was berthed next to us…..

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…..two massive ships!

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The port gates…..

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…..where this duo gave us a sample of Caribbean oil drum music.

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The water taxi station is very close to the port gates.

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These two Dutch Marines high-speed boats were kept at the station.

After a short queue at the water taxi station, we boarded the “Black Stallion” boat.

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The “Black Stallion” water taxi.

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Aboard the water taxi. It was a very enjoyable way to reach the town, much better than walking as it was a scorchingly hot day.

When we disembarked from the water taxi we walked the full length of Philipsburg’s High Street
looking at the ‘duty-free’ shops although, from experience, we have found that they are generally no cheaper than back in the UK, even after paying VAT.

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This old yellow car has been on display on all our trips to St. Maarten.

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Philipsburg’s High Street is very narrow and was very busy with two large ships in port.

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The colourful L’escargo restaurant.

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The old Courthouse.

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The old Methodist Chapel dating back to 1851.

At the end of the High Street, we turned left until we reached the beach and returned to the water taxi station, stopping on the way for cooling drinks (orange juice for Chris and a beer for me).

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Thar be pirates, including Captain Jack Sparrow!

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Walking alongside the beach, towards the water taxi station……

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…..and looking back.

Back at the water taxi station we caught a boat back to the ship and had lunch in the Main Dining Room and then returned to our cabin to freshen up.

We then caught another water taxi back to Philipsburg and visited a shop to buy an MP3 player for myself and take a few more photos. We came across Arne and Sue who were sat at a table outside a restaurant, having ordered a late lunch.

Back at the water taxi stop, we caught a boat back to the ship. We passed a jetty where young local children were jumping into the sea, doing gymnastics. They really enjoyed showing off to the passing boats and we really enjoyed watching them!

Back on the ship, Chris went for a swim in one of the swimming pools, although she found the water to be rather cold again. I relaxed in one of the comfortable sunbeds with a good book.

The water in our cabin was off for a while in the late afternoon (due to a fault in the system) but fortunately it was restored in time for our early evening showers.

In the evening we had our drinks in the Viking Lounge, had dinner and then retired to our cabin to read before going to bed.

In the morning we would be visiting Charlotte Amalie, St Thomas, a US Virgin island and we would have to face the American Immigration officials, not our favourite people!


================================================


Continued tomorrow ……...
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby Gillzajoker » 28 Feb 2021 12:33

Glad we are back in action again, Geoff! I remember reading about the Patty Hearst case at the time,
but didn't know she had been pardoned - that doesn't sit well with me, but proves it's not what you know.......
The Ice Show looked amazing - would certainly have enjoyed that - and I like quirky things like the dancing
waiters in Johnny Rockets.
Have been to St. Maarten quite a few times, and enjoyed seeing all the photos and hearing again about
it's history. :D
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby judgegeoff » 01 Mar 2021 08:34

Day 12 – Tuesday 11th November 2014 - Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas


Our ship berthed in the port at Charlotte Amalie, the capital city of St. Thomas, one of the US Virgin Islands.

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A map of the Virgin Islands.

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A map of St. Thomas, showing Charlotte Amalie.

The island was originally settled around 1500 BC by the Ciboney people. They were later replaced by the Arawaks and then the Caribs. Christopher Columbus sighted the island in 1493 on his second voyage to the New World.

The Dutch West Indies Company established a trading post on the island in 1657, but the island was then resettled by Denmark in 1671 and the first slave ships arrived there two years later. The island had the biggest slave market in the world and sugar cane farming became the biggest industry. In 1691 the island’ principal settlement was renamed Charlotte Amalie to honour the wife of King Christian V.

The first British invasion and occupation of the island occurred in 1801. The islands were returned to Denmark in 1802, under the terms of the Treaty of Amiens. Fire destroyed hundreds of homes in Charlotte Amalie in 1804. The second British occupation of the island occurred from 1807 to 1815, after the Invasion of the Danish West Indies (1807), during which they built Fort Cowell on Hassel Island.

In 1917, Saint Thomas was purchased (along with the rest of the Virgin Islands) by the United States for $25 million in gold ($499 million today), as part of a defensive strategy to maintain control over the Caribbean and the Panama Canal during the First World War.

The United States granted citizenship to the residents in 1927. The U.S. Department of the Interior took over administrative duties in 1931. American forces were based on the island during the Second World War. In 1954, the passage of the U.S. Virgin Islands Organic Act officially granted territorial status to the three islands and allowed for the formation of a local senate with politics dominated by the American Republican and Democratic parties. Full home rule was achieved in 1970.


==================================================

The ship arrived in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, at 7:00 am. This was our first visit (on this cruise) to U.S. territory and so we had to obtain clearance from U.S. Immigration before we could leave the ship. We had been advised to attend the Main Dining Room between 8:00 am and 8:30 am, but found we had to queue on Promenade deck 5 for quite some time, so Chris and I took turns to sit and wait. As we entered the Main Dining Room a member of the crew, recognising that I had a walking stick, directed us to an Immigration Officer who was dealing with people with mobility issues. We were very grateful for being fast-tracked as, with no feeling in my lower legs, I find standing still, i.e. queueing, very difficult.

Having obtained U.S. Immigration clearance we then went up to the Windjammer Cafe for a buffet breakfast. We then left the ship and caught a jeepney type taxi from the port into the town which cost $4 per person. We had to wait for the vehicle to fill up before we could leave the port, this took only a couple of minutes.

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Our ship was berthed right by ‘Senor Frog's' bar and restaurant with its swimming pool.

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Typical Charlotte Amalie taxis. St. Thomas is the only U.S. territory where vehicles drive, like us, on the left. However, as nearly all vehicles are imported from the U.S. and so are left-hand drive, overtaking is a rather risky procedure!

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In the town, we were surprised by the number of hens running around loose……

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…..including this one with her chicks.

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Remind me please, what nationality is St. Thomas?……

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…..Are you sure?

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We passed this (high security?) chilled drinks wagon.

We had a walk through the town, but found that most of the shops seemed to be selling jewellery, watches and photographic equipment etc., clearly aimed at affluent cruise ship passengers (so not us!). So we gave up on the High Street and tried exploring the narrow side streets and alleys which we found to be much more interesting for us. We found a nice cafe and enjoyed some very tasty coffees.

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Too many high-end shops for us.

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We like the balconies on some of the buildings…..

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…..like this one

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The busy High Street.

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We found the alleys to be more to our taste.

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They had more interesting shops and some nice cafes and restaurants.

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We found this antique shop that was very interesting. We really enjoy looking around foreign antique shops as we see things that are never seen in U.K. antique shops.

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Inside the shop.

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From the cafe where we had coffees, we could watch some seaplanes taking off and landing.

We found a market which was also interesting to look around, but by this time my legs were very tired, so we caught another taxi back to the ship.

Back on board, we went to the Diamond Lounge for speciality coffees and then went up to the Windjammer Cafe for a buffet lunch. After lunch, I retired to our cabin to rest my legs and my back as they were rather sore. Chris went up on the sports deck to sunbathe and take some video footage.

In the early evening, after showering and changing, we met up with Arne and Sue and went for dinner in the Main Dining Room. After dinner, we went to the theatre at 10:45 pm to watch a comedy magic show by Neal Austin who was very amusing.

After the show, we went for a stroll on the decks and then retired to our cabins for the night.

In the morning we would be visiting San Juan, Puerto Rico.


=================================================


Continued tomorrow ………………...
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby Gillzajoker » 01 Mar 2021 10:56

Enjoyed hearing about the history of Charlotte Amalie, Geoff, and I, too, was amazed by the amount
of jewellery shops on the High Street and although by no means an affluent cruise passenger, I treated
myself to a dainty gold watch, as it was Valentine's Day on that particular occasion. I recall that quite
a few passengers spent the whole day in Senor Frog's. What a waste of a port! :D
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Re: MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby Camela » 01 Mar 2021 23:20

We have visited St Croix (US). Thank you Geoff, your cruise reminiscences are cheering me up and reminding me of my cruises. I still do not want to book a cruise (though we do have a postponed Norway) as I really want a similar experience which unfortunately, I'm not sure will come in the immediate future with social distancing.
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby judgegeoff » 02 Mar 2021 08:09

Many thanks Gill and Camela for your kind words. I have enjoyed writing them as they have revived so many good memories for Chris and myself. I am very lucky that Chris keeps a daily diary on all our cruises - these form the backbone of these blogs and all I have to do is pad them up a bit and then go through our photo memory cards to find suitable photos (I have posted over 6,000 photos with these 'memories')!
Geoff

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"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby judgegeoff » 02 Mar 2021 08:31

Day 13 – Wednesday 12th November 2014 - San Juan, Puerto Rico

This morning the ship arrived in San Juan, Puerto Rico, at around 8:00 am.

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The location of Puerto Rico.

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Map of Puerto Rico, showing San Juan.

San Juan ("Saint John") is the capital and most populous municipality in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, an unincorporated territory of the United States. As of the 2010 census, it is the 46th-largest city under the jurisdiction of the United States, with a population of 395,326. San Juan was founded by Spanish colonists in 1521, who called it Ciudad de Puerto Rico ("Rich Port City"). Puerto Rico's capital is the third oldest European-established capital city in the Americas, after Santo Domingo, in the Dominican Republic, founded in 1496, and Panama City, in Panama, founded in 1521 and is the oldest European-established city in the U.S. proper or U.S. territories. Several historical buildings are located in San Juan; among the most notable are the city's former defensive forts, Fort San Felipe del Morro and Fort San Cristóbal, and La Fortaleza, the oldest executive mansion in continuous use in the Americas.

Over the centuries the island defied assaults by various nations but, after the Spanish-American war of 1898, the Treaty of Paris ceded Puerto Rico to America, along with other Caribbean islands.

However, the island’s culture stays true to its Spanish roots and Caribbean heritage, where customs and folklore continue to thrive alongside modern conveniences.


==================================================


Together with Arne and Sue, we had breakfast in the Main Dining Room at 8:30 am and then had a quick walk on deck to decide whether we needed to take coats with us in the town. The “Carnival Liberty” had come into the port ahead of us and there was also a British warship, “HMS Dragon”, a type 45 Daring-class air defence destroyer berthed near us.

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The “Carnival Liberty”.

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“HMS Dragon”.

We left the ship and walked the short distance into the town (San Juan is one of those ports where cruise ships berth almost at the end of the High Street). After having a look around some of the town, we found a courtyard bar/cafe where we ordered 3 beers and a diet coke (for Sue).

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A nice shady place for a cooling drink.

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“Cheers”!

It is always a pleasure to walk around San Juan as there are some lovely buildings on the very narrow streets.

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Shaded streets.

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Lovely old buildings.

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‘Senor Frog’s’ bar/restaurant, with a giant frog on top of the building. There seems to be one of this restaurant chain in many Caribbean ports.

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An elegant facade.

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Narrow streets…...

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…..with a restaurant table in this one!!!

We decided to walk along some of the old defensive walls which are 3 miles long. In the early 1500s, the battery and tower that would become El Morro protected the harbour and provided some refuge for the people of San Juan during attacks, however it did not provide any defence for the city itself. During the English attack and occupation of 1598 and the Dutch attack of 1625, much of San Juan was destroyed. The building of the wall commenced after the Dutch attack, but construction was sporadic and depended on the availability of funds and labour. By 1790 the wall completely encircled the city and included embrasures (gun ports from which cannon could be fired) and guaritas (sentry boxes). San Juan’s long city wall became a key part of its fortifications.

The completion of the wall, the construction of Castillo de San Cristóbal and the expansion of San Juan’s other defences had a considerable effect on the city. The city’s defences covered over 250 acres, leaving only some 62 acres inside the city walls for private and city construction. For many of San Juan’s residents in the 1800s, the defensive walls made the city feel more like a prison than a refuge. From a population of nearly 8,000 in 1803, San Juan grew to 27,000 by the 1890s. Local officials finally convinced the military authorities to demolish a section of the city’s walls in 1897 and allow the overcrowded city to expand. The destruction of the Santiago Gate, which allowed the city to expand to the east, also promoted a sense that local interests were beginning to replace San Juan’s imperial concerns.

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Heading towards the old walls.

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The town’s defensive walls.

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From the old walls, we watched the “Nieuw Amsterdam” cruise ship enter the port. Note the guarita (sentry box).

Feeling a little peckish we returned for a late lunch in the Windjammer buffet restaurant. After the meal, we refreshed ourselves in our cabins and then went ashore again and into the town. We stopped off at a ‘Ben & Jerry’s’ ice cream parlour where we had enjoyed ice cream cones on previous visits to San Juan. They make the waffle cones whilst you wait and, for some reason we couldn’t explain, the ice cream did not seem to melt when put into the still-warm cones!

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‘Ben & Jerry’s’ ice cream parlour – “Love, peace and ice cream”!

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Mmmmmmm!

After another walk around the town, we returned to the port and found that the “Nieuw Amsterdam” was berthed between the “Carnival Liberty” and ourselves.

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Our lovely ship.

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The three cruise ships berthed in San Juan.

At 5:00 pm we went up on deck to watch the ship’s departure from San Juan.

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Pulling away from the quay.

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Backing out, passing the “Nieuw Amsterdam”.

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We could see that “HMS Dragon” was also preparing to leave, with tugs in attendance.

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We passed this US Coastguard cutter.

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Clear of the port the ship turned.

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View of the city walls with the Governor’s palace behind it.

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Passing Fort San Felipe Del Morro.

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“HMS Dragon” came past us at speed, with hardly any bow wave or stern wake. A very streamlined vessel.

Tonight was to be our last formal dress code night and so we returned to our cabin, showered and dressed up in our finery and then went up to the Viking Crown Lounge for our complimentary drinks.

After dinner in the Main Dining Room we went to see the show at 10:45 pm – “ABBACADABRA” - a celebration of the music of the group ABBA, presented by the ships orchestra and the singers and dancers. It was an excellent show and we very much enjoyed it.

We had a brief walk on deck before returning to our cabin for the night, where we saw this little chap :-

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Checking up on tomorrow’s activities!

Tomorrow would be our last sea day before reaching Fort Lauderdale in Florida.


==================================================


Continued tomorrow ………………...
Geoff

Booked cruise :-
"MSC Orchestra" - Cape Town to Venice 2020 (now virtual)
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MEMORIES (No. 18) - TRANSATLANTIC CRUISE - 2014

Postby Gillzajoker » 02 Mar 2021 12:37

Lovely to see San Juan again, Geoff, and loved the history and photos (drooled over the ice cream!)
Couldn't have managed the 3-mile walk along the walls, though, much prefer to mooch along the
narrow streets and soak in the atmosphere! :D
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